Roman goddesses

Roman Goddesses A-Z 🔱📜

Roman Goddesses 🔱 A-Z List of Roman Deities 📜

ADDucation’s list of Roman goddesses includes the parents, consorts, siblings, groups and titles of Roman godesses. ADDucation’s mega list of Roman deities also includes siblings, offspring and Greek equivalents. Similarly ADDucation’s other lists on Greek and Roman mythology include key facts, trivia and fascinating insights into the everyday lives of Greek and Roman people.

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Roman Goddesses 🔱 Deity of Group/s Parents Consort/s
Abeona
Abeona was the Roman goddess of partings. Conception, childbirth and childcare. Indigitamenta[3].
Abundantia
Roman divine personification of abundance and prosperity. Abstract deity[4].
Acca Larentia
Acca Larentia was a mythical women who later became a Roman goddess associated with the Lares and identified with Larentina, Mana Genita / Geneta Mana and Muta. Agricultural Roman goddess. Etruscan origin. Faustulus (mortal shepherd).
Adeona / Adiona
Roman goddess of safe return, learning to walk and guiding children home. One of the Roman goddesses of childhood development. Indigitamenta[3].
Aequitas / Aecetia / Equitas
Roman divine personification of equity or fairness beyond legal justice. Used as an epithet “byname” for propaganda, e.g. Aequitas Augusti. Abstract deity[4].
Aestas / Aestatis
Roman goddess of summer usually depicted naked and garlands of grain/ears of corn. Associated with Phoebus.
Agenoria
Roman goddess that encourages children to be active, e.g. walking reasoning, counting, singing etc. One of the Roman goddesses of childhood development. Indigitamenta[3].
Alemona
Roman goddess of unborn children who nourishes the growth of the embryo. Conception and pregnancy. Indigitamenta[3].
Angerona / Angeronia
Roman goddess of will, the winter solstice, suffering and silence who relieved pain and sorrow of men. Angerona was the protector of Rome and keeper of the sacred name of the city – which should not be spoken to conceal it from her enemies.
Anna Perenna /Annae Perena
Anna Perenna was the Roman goddess of the succession of years based on the annual lunar cycle of the moon (per annum). Represented as an old woman. See also Luna. Bellus (king of Sidon)
Antevorta / Porrima
Antevorta was the Roman goddess of childbirth and the future. Present when a child was born head first. See also Postvorta. The Camenae. Aspect of Carmenta. Conception, childbirth and childcare. Indigitamenta[3].
Aurora / Mater Matuta
Aurora was the virgin Roman goddess of dawn and matrons. Latin god Tithonus (mortal prince of Troy)
Bellona Bellona was the Roman goddess of war. Deified mortal. Jupiter and Juno Mars
Bona Dea
“Good goddess”
Bona Dea was the Roman goddess of chastity, fertility, prophecy for women, healing and the protection of individuals and the Roman state. Her “true” name was known only to herself. Fauni. Faunus Faunus
Caelus
Caelus was the Roman god of the sky. Primordial god (Uranus). Ether and Dies (Day, Hemera in Greek)
Candelifera
Roman childbirth goddess that bears a candle during night time labor and possibly to ward off evil spirits by candlelight in the nursery. Childbirth and neonatel. Indigitamenta[3].
Catius Pater
“Father Catius”
Catius Pater was the Roman god who protected boys who was invoked to sharpen the intellect of children. One of the Roman goddesses of childhood development. Indigitamenta[3]. Tellus
Cardea / Carda / Carna / Cranea / Cranaë
Cardea was the Roman goddess of the hinges of doorways. Specifically Carna was associated with building strong muscles and defending flesh and internal organs from strigea (witches). One of the Roman goddesses of childhood development. Nymph. Aspect of Juno. Helernus maybe. (According to Ovid Carna was born in Helernus’ sacred grove) Janus (in Ovid’s Fasti the nymph Cranaë is raped by Janus)
Carmena
Carmena was the Roman goddess that enabled children to sing. One of the Roman goddesses of childhood development. Aspect of Juno.
The Carmenae / The Casmenae
The Carmenae were prophetic Roman nymph goddesses of childbirth, fountains and wells. See also (The Muses). The Carmenae:
  • Antevorta.
  • Postvorta.
  • Carmenta / Carmentis.
  • Egeria /Aegeria.
The Camenae. Roman gods group.
Carmenta / Carmentis (Nicostrate)
Carmenta was the Roman goddess of childbirth and prophecy, technological innovation, protection of mothers and children. Di flaminales[2]. The Camenae. Cimmerian Sibyl. Mercury
Ceres Ceres was the Roman goddess of the bounty (of growth and creation) including farming, agriculture, the harvest, fertility and motherly relationships. Di selecti[1]. Dii Consentes[7]. Di flaminales[2]. Aventine Triad (Ceres, Liber, Libera). Saturn and Ops
Cinxia / Virginiensis
Roman goddess that loosened the bride’s girdle after marriage so the groom could remove it after their wedding. Conception and pregnancy. Aspect of Juno.
Concordia
Concordia was the Roman goddess of concord (agreement and harmony) in marriage and society. Abstract deity[4].
Cuba
Roman goddess that helps a child transition from cradle to bed. One of the Roman goddesses of childhood development. Indigitamenta[3].
Cunina
Roman goddess that protects the cradle from malevolent magic. One of the Roman goddesses of childhood development. Indigitamenta[3].
Cybele / Magna Mater
Cybele was the Roman “Great Mother” or mother of the Roman gods. Phrygian goddess.
Dea Dia “divine goddess”
Dea means “goddess” and Dia means “divine” so Dea Dia is the divine Roman goddess of growth and fertility. Sometimes identified with Ceres.
Dea Tacita “The silent goddess. mute goddess”
Dea Tacita was the Roman goddess of the dead. She sealed up hostile mouths and unfriendly tongues. Dea Tacita is associated with Larunda. Muse (Carmenae). Di inferni. Di Manes. Chthonic deity[6].
Decima
Decima was the Roman goddess who used her rod to measure the thread of life (lifespan) at birth. The Parcae (the Fates. Greek: The Moirai). Conception and pregnancy. Scotus and Nox
Diana (triple goddess)
Diana was the Roman virgin goddess of childbirth and women. Diana was a triple goddess (Diana triformis) with history dating back to 6 BC. As Diana she was goddess of the hunt and wild animals, as Luna she was goddess of the moon and as Diana Trivia (Hecate) she was goddess of the underworld. One of the most famous Roman goddesses. 1 of 3 maiden goddesses along with Minerva and Vesta. Triad of Roman goddesses with Egeria and Virbius. Di selecti[1]. Sabine goddess. Jupiter and Latona
Dominduca
Roman goddess who accompanied children returning home. See also Interduca. One of the Roman goddesses of childhood development. Aspect of Juno.
Edusa / Edula / Edulia /Educa / Edesia
Roman goddess who taught children to eat food and nourishment. One of the Roman goddesses of childhood development. Aspect of Juno.
Egeria / Aegeria
Roman minor nymph nature goddess associated with a place or land form. The Camenae. Aspect of Carmenta. Childbirth.
Numa Pompilius, (Second Sabine king of Rome).
Epona
Epona was a Celtic-Roman goddess protector of horses, mares, ponies, donkeys, mules and fertility.
Febris “Fever”
Febris was the Roman goddess who warded off and protected against fever. Di inferi. Chthonic deity[6].
Feronia Roman goddess of fertility, wildlife, abundance, health and granted freedom and/or civil rights to slaves. Sabine goddess. Abstract deity[4].
Fides Fides was the Roman goddess of trust and good faith (bona fides). Sabine goddess.
Felicitas / Felicitas Augusta / Felicitas Fausta / Felicitas Publica / Felicitas Temporum
Felicitas was the Roman goddess of woman’s fertility, good fortune and good luck in general.
Flora Flora was the Roman goddess of youth, spring and flowers. Flora was one of several Roman fertility goddesses. Di flaminales[2]. Sabine goddess. Favonius (God of the west wind).
Fluonia / Fluvionia
Roman goddess who holds back menstruation to allow conception. Conception and pregnancy. Indigitamenta[3].
Fornax
Roman goddess of ovens and baking of bread.
Fortuna and epithets
Fortuna was the Roman goddess of good fortune and the Roman divine personification of luck. Sabine goddess. Abstract deity[4]. Jupiter
Furrina / Furina Roman goddess of springs and bubbling water. Di flaminales[2]
The Genii / Genius / Genius Publicus The Genii are anonymous Roman gods and goddesses. Every person is followed by their own genius from birth until death. Most places and things had a genius and there were specific Genii “guardian spirits” including Genius Publicus Populi Romani who looked after the Roman people. Di inferi.
Invidia
Invidia was the Roman goddess of jealousy, divine retribution and envy. Di inferi. The Dirae.
Intercidona
Roman goddess who protects the mother and newborn child against Silvanus the forest god. Neo-natel and childhood.
Interduca
Roman goddess that accompanies children leaving the house. See also Domiduca. One of the Roman goddesses of childhood development. Aspect of Juno.
Juno / Luno / Iovino / Iuno Regina “Queen Juno”
Juno was the Roman goddess of the sky, childbirth, marriage and beginnings. Protector and counselor of the Roman state. When Juno touched a magical herb she became pregnant and gave birth to Mars. Di selecti[1]. Capitoline Triad (Jupiter, Juno, Minerva). Saturn Jupiter
Juno Moneta
Roman goddess responsible for protecting money and funds in general. Aspect of Juno. Do you know this Roman Goddesses’ consorts?
Justitia / Justice / Iustitia / Lustitia
Justitia was the Roman goddess of justice, sometimes called “Lady Justice”. Typically depicted in Western cultures with sword and scales, often blindfolded symbolizing “Blind Justice”. Abstract deity[4]. Jupiter
Juturna Juturna was the Roman goddess of fountains, wells and springs. Identified with a spring in Latium and a pool near the temple of Vesta in the Forum of Rome. Naiad water nymph. Volturnus Janus, Jupiter
Juventas / Lucentus
Ancient Roman goddess of youth and rejuvenation, especially young men who had just come of age (to wear the adult toga). Ancient Roman deity. Hercules
Larenta / Larunda / Larunde / Laranda / Lara / Acca Larentia / Acca Larentina / Lupa
Larenta is the municipal Roman goddess of Larentum who was imported as a Roman earth goddess following its conquest. Naiad. Di inferi. Chthonic deity[6]. Mercury
Levana
Ancient Roman goddess that symbolically “lifts” the baby from Mother Earth for the midwife to cut the umbilical cord. Childbirth. Ancient Roman deity.
Libera Roman goddess of wine, freedom and fertility (contributing semina “seed”). Libera is often combined with Proserpina. Aventine Triad (Ceres, Liber, Libera). Conception and childbirth. Deified mortal. Ceres Liber
Libertas Roman goddess of freedom and the personification of freedom.
Often depicted on coins and statues, most famously the Statue of Liberty in New York, USA.
Lucina / Juno Lucina
Lucina was the Roman goddess of childbirth and childhood development. Lucina introduces babies to the light. Di nixi /Nixae. Sabine goddess. One of the Roman goddesses of hildbirth and childhood development. Indigitamenta[3]. Jupiter
Luna Luna was the Roman goddess of the moon. See also Anna Perenna. One of the best known Roman goddesses. Di selecti[1]. Di inferi. Chthonic deity[6]. Sabine goddess.
Maia
Maia was the Roman goddess of growth. Adopted Greek goddess associated with earth goddesses Terra and Bona Dea Atlas and Pleione (an Oceanid nymph) Jupiter
Mania
Mania was the Roman goddess of the dead and ruler of the underworld. Di inferi. Chthonic deity[6]. Mantus
Meditrina
Meditrina was the Roman goddess of wine, health, longevity, healing and medicine. Aesculapius and Epione
Mena / Dea Mena
Mena was the Roman goddess of menstrual flow. Conception and childbirth. Indigitamenta[3].
Mens Bona / Bona Mens /Mens “Good mind”
Mens Bona was a Roman goddess that gave a newborn child consciousness and reasoning. One of the Roman goddesses of childhood development. Aspect of Juno.
Minerva Minerva was the Roman virgin goddess of wisdom, the arts and battle. Her patronage included learning, handicrafts, doctors, teachers, artists, strategic warfare, trade. Di selecti[1]. Capitoline Triad (Jupiter, Juno, Minerva). Sabine goddess. 1 of 3 maiden goddesses along with Diana and Vesta. Jupiter and Metis
Moneta
Moneta was the Roman goddess of memory. Caelus and Tellus (Greek: Uranus and Gaia) Jupiter
Morta
Morta was the Roman goddess of death. Morta cuts the thread of life and chooses the manner of a person’s death. See also Parca. The Parcae (the Fates. Greek: The Moirai). Childbirth. Scotus and Nox
Nerio / Nerine
Nerio was the Roman goddess of war and personification of valor. Sabine goddess. Mars
Nona
Nona was the Roman goddess that spun the thread of life from her distaff onto her spindle at birth. The Parcae (the Fates. Greek: The Moirai). Conception, pregnancy. Childbirth. Indigitamenta[3]. Scotus and Nox
Nox Nox was the primordial Roman goddess of the night. Primordial goddess.
Nundina
Nundina was the Roman goddess of birth naming ceremonies. Because girls mature before boys they were named on the eighth day after birth, boys were named on the ninth day. The umbilical cord typically drops off on the seventh day signifying the child now has its own fate. A family feast typically followed the naming ceremony. One of the Roman goddesses of childbirth and childhood development.
Numeria
Numeria was the Roman goddess that taught children to count. One of the Roman goddesses of childhood development. Indigitamenta[3].
Ops/Opis / Ops Consiva / Ops Opifera “Plenty”
Ops was the Roman goddess of the harvest and fertility. Associated with Consus. Chthonic deity[6]. Sabine goddess. Caelus and Terra Saturn
Ossipago / Ossipagina / Ossilago / Opigena / Ossipango / Ossipaga Roman goddess that builds strong bones. One of the Roman goddesses of childhood development. Indigitamenta[3].
Palatua Roman teaching goddess of the Palatine Hill. Di flaminales[2].
Pales or Pales
Roman goddess or god of shepherds, flocks and livestock. Sabine goddess or god.
Partula
Roman goddess that oversees separation of the child from the mother and sets the limit of life. See also Morta. Conception and pregnancy. Childbirth. Indigitamenta[3].
Pax Pax was the Roman goddess of peace and security. Pax is typically depicted holding an olive branch, a cornucopia and a scepter. One of the Roman goddesses of childhood development. Indigitamenta[3]. Abstract deity[4]. Jupiter and Justitia
Paventia / Paventina
Roman goddess that distracts fear from children. One of the Roman goddesses of childhood development. Indigitamenta[3].
Peta Roman goddess who looks after a child’s first wants. Indigitamenta[3].
Pietas
Roman goddess that cautioned humans against intrusion into the realm of the Roman gods. Abstract deity[4].
Pertunda
Pertunda was the Roman goddess of sexual penetration. Conception and pregnancy. Indigitamenta[3].
Pomona Pomona was the Roman goddess of fruitful abundance, fruit trees, gardens, and orchards. Di flaminales[2]. Vertumnus
Postvorta / Postverta / Prosa
Postvorta was the Roman goddess of childbirth and the past. Present when child born feet first (breech birth). See also Antevorta. The Camenae. Aspect of Carmenta. Childbirth. Indigitamenta.
Potina / Potica / Bibesa
Roman goddess that enables a child to drink. One of the Roman goddesses of childhood development. Indigitamenta[3].
Potua Roman childhood goddess. One of the Roman goddesses of childhood development. Indigitamenta[3].
Prema (dea Mater) / Prema mater
Prema was the Roman mother goddess who caused the bride to be submissive on her wedding night. Conception and pregnancy. Indigitamenta[3].
Proserpina/Proserpine Proserpina was the Roman goddess of springtime and Queen of the underworld. Proserpina was a fusion of Libera, Persephone and Demeter (Greek agricultural goddesses). Di inferi. Chthonic deity[6]. Ceres Dis Pater / Pluto
Robigus / Robigus or Robigus / Robigus
Robigus was the Roman god or goddess of rust, protected crops and agricultural disease.
Roma
Roma was the Roman personification of the city of Rome and the Roman state. State deity. Abstract deity[4].
Salacia Roman goddess of salt water who presided over the ocean depths and was the personification of calm and sunlit seas. Sea nymph. Neptune
Salus (Salus Semonia) Roman goddess of safety and well-being (welfare, health and prosperity) of individuals and the state. Sabine goddess. Abstract deity[4]. Aesculapius
Securitas
Securitas was the Roman goddess of security and stability both personal and of Rome. Abstract deity[4].
Sentia Sentia was the Roman goddess who gives sentience (thought and senses) to the unborn child. Conception and pregnancy. Indigitamenta[3].
Spes Spes was the Roman goddess of hope. Abstract deity[4].
Statina / Statilina / Statinus / Statilinus Roman goddess who gives the baby “fitness” in order that the father accepts responsibility to raise the child. Childbirth. Indigitamenta[3].
Tellus Mater / Tellus / Terra Mater “Mother Earth”
Tellus Mater was the primordial Roman goddess of Mother Earth and fertility. Di selecti[1]. Primordial goddess (Gaia). Abstract deity[4]. Caelus
Trivia
(Queen of Ghosts)
Trivia was the Roman goddess of sorcery, witchcraft, haunted graveyards and crossroads. Di inferi. Chthonic deity[6].
Venus / Venus Victrix / Venus Genetrix
Venus was the Roman goddess of love and beauty. Venus is one of the most famous Roman goddesses. Di selecti[1] Jupiter and Dione
Mars, Vulcan, Aeneas (mortal).
Veritas Veritas was the Roman goddess of truth.
Vesta Vesta was the Roman virgin goddess of home and hearth. Vesta was a beloved household Roman goddess and one of the best known Roman goddesses. Di selecti[1]. 1 of 3 maiden goddesses along with Diana and Minerva.
Saturn and Ops
Vica Pota Vica Pota was an early Roman goddess who became overshadowed by Victoria because her traits “vincere” (conquer) and “potiri” (get possession of) were identified with Victoria.
Victoria Victoria was the Roman goddess of victory and triumph over death. Dispiter and Vacuna are identified with Victoria. Abstract deity[4]. Adapted from Sabine goddess. Pallas (Greek) and Styx (Greek)
Virtus or Virtus
Virtus or Virtus was the Roman goddess or god of bravery and military strength. Personification of virture. Arete
Vitula
Vitula was the Roman goddess of joy and celebration (of victories).
Volumnus / Volumna
Roman goddess that instills the will to do good in children. One of the Roman goddesses of childhood development. Indigitamenta[3].
Voluptas / Volupta
Voluptas was the Roman goddess of sensual pleasure or delight and to drive away the sorrow and chagrin of life. the Gratiae (The Graces / The Charities). Cupid and Phyche

Notes and FAQ about ADDucation Roman Goddesses A to Z list:

  • [1]Di selecti: 20 main Roman goddesses and gods.
  • [2]Di flaminales: 15 Roman goddesses and gods with devoted flamens (priests, plural “flamines”).
  • [3]Indigitamenta: Roman deities primarily known by name alone, or as an epithet of a major god or a minor entity or epithets of major gods. The College of Pontiffs maintained the indigitamenta list to ensure the correct names were invoked in public prayers.
  • [4] Abstract deity: Divine personification of a virtue which can be invoked in prayer or used as an epithet “byname/nickname”.
  • [6]Chthonic deity: Underworld “subterranean” god/goddess or spirit.
  • This list of Roman deities is primarily compiled from the works of Roman scholar Marcus Terentius Varro (116-27 BC) and Roman poet Ovid (43 BC ~ 17 AD) and other Roman historians.
  • Roman mythology has many conflicting stories so this table of Roman goddesses will always be a work in progress. Please use the comments area to help us resolve issues and improve the list.

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